Created by:  Stanford University

LevelBeginner
Commitment5 weeks of study, 1 hour/week
Language
English, Subtitles: Russian, Czech
Hardware ReqNo special hardware required.
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.6 stars
Average User Rating 4.6See what learners said
Syllabus

FAQs
How It Works
Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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Certificates

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Creators
Stanford University
The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly referred to as Stanford University or Stanford, is an American private research university located in Stanford, California on an 8,180-acre (3,310 ha) campus near Palo Alto, California, United States.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.6 out of 5 of 4,619 ratings

Great course , short and full of important to know information. Love it

Very useful information. This course make me much more aware of food that I eat.

it is a junior class but fun.

it is helpful for people who interested and could be a guideline to instruct people behavior in a healthily way

The course is nicely presented with clear speakers. It gives a good and basic overview of what includes healthy foods and the problem with processed foods. The use of visual aids in the form of pictures, graphs and short video clips definitely works well with this kind of topic. As an introduction or reminder of good eating habits, this course does its job just fine.

However, I did expect more depth. The source material was very short and simple, and the few academic parts (such as the graphics charts and chemical bonds making up some of the nutrients) were quickly glossed over. This also led to many quiz-questions being almost trivial because the answer was pretty much impossible to get wrong. For example, there are many questions of the following kind: "Q: What is true about vegetables? A: 1.They contain a variety of healthy nutrients. 2. It's better to eat only meat. 3. Processed foods are far healthier. 4. They contain extreme amounts of calories. 5. Supplements are much more effective sources of vitamins." These kinds of questions do not add any value to the assignment in my opinion. I felt that a little more depth at least would be good (without having to go overboard), and maybe some extra scientific articles (the extra suggested material are all full books, which is a lot to plow through).

However, since I understand the course is not meant to be an 8-week academic investment but an introduction to get people interested in topics concerning food and food habits, this course does a fine job of that, and I like the enthusiasm of the speakers! And they do often provide the simple material with statistics, which is good.