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Avis et commentaires pour d'étudiants pour Apprendre à apprendre : des outils mentaux puissants qui vous aideront à maitriser les matières difficiles par Solutions d'enseignement approfondi

4.8
étoiles
75,761 évaluations
21,474 avis

À propos du cours

This course gives you easy access to the invaluable learning techniques used by experts in art, music, literature, math, science, sports, and many other disciplines. We’ll learn about how the brain uses two very different learning modes and how it encapsulates (“chunks”) information. We’ll also cover illusions of learning, memory techniques, dealing with procrastination, and best practices shown by research to be most effective in helping you master tough subjects. Using these approaches, no matter what your skill levels in topics you would like to master, you can change your thinking and change your life. If you’re already an expert, this peep under the mental hood will give you ideas for turbocharging successful learning, including counter-intuitive test-taking tips and insights that will help you make the best use of your time on homework and problem sets. If you’re struggling, you’ll see a structured treasure trove of practical techniques that walk you through what you need to do to get on track. If you’ve ever wanted to become better at anything, this course will help serve as your guide. This course can be taken independent of, concurrent with, or prior to, its companion course, Mindshift. (Learning How to Learn is more learning-focused, and Mindshift is more career-focused.) A related course by the same instructors is Uncommon Sense Teaching. To join the fully translated Portuguese version of the course, visit: https://www.coursera.org/learn/aprender To join the fully translated Spanish version of the course, visit: https://www.coursera.org/learn/aprendiendo-a-aprender To join the fully translated Chinese version of the course, visit: https://www.coursera.org/learn/ruhe-xuexi To join the fully translated French version of the course, visit : http://www.coursera.org/learn/apprendre-comment-apprendre...

Meilleurs avis

EA
28 avr. 2017

This was a great course! I learned a number of different techniques and strategies for learning more effectively that I can't wait to implement in my studies. I highly recommend Learning How to Learn.

KG
3 févr. 2016

I specially like the optional interviews. These learning case studies are quite insightful and you might just find a something that you can relate to, which might help in the grand scheme of things :)

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176 - 200 sur 10,000 Avis pour Apprendre à apprendre : des outils mentaux puissants qui vous aideront à maitriser les matières difficiles

par mona

6 oct. 2016

this is a good course but if you think better and deeply you will understand that deep inside you your self know this things but maybe you did not do in daily life.

par Paul T

24 nov. 2015

Didn't learn as much as expected about learning how to learn. Maybe my expectations were too high.

par joan b

6 oct. 2015

Really basic, with some interesting stuff but could be reduced to a third of the time...

par LEELA H K

26 août 2017

Very basic and useful only for the students in high school... not for professionals.

par Tor G S

1 avr. 2016

Boring techniques for remembering.

Nothing related to learning or understanding.

par nadia d

27 avr. 2017

i think the coming classes will be great more than that ... but it's good

par annabelle r

31 mai 2017

The interview at the end was the best part of this course.

par PAVAN R D

13 oct. 2016

extremely easy and sparse content.

par Teera L

27 sept. 2015

I want it to be more exciting.

par INDIA I C

17 oct. 2015

superb course I ever had

par Yevhen M

20 juin 2020

The first chapter was pretty good. But everything else was just obvious things - check summaries and you will see. Learn, do breaks, sleep well, do sport, don't forget to repeat what've learnt. There are some interesting facts but they are not worth spent time.

par Horia C

13 juin 2016

This is definitely a course for someone that has finished a higher degree. if you've done that, there's a very big change that you already know about 90%-95% of the techniques presented in thous course.

par Lidia d C M M

28 mars 2016

ME DECEPCIONA LA FALTA DE TRADUCCIÓN AL ESPAÑOL.

NO puedo responder las preguntas porque no sé inglés.

Espero se solucione este problema para continuar.

Gracias.

Lidia Menares M

par Chayton C

4 mai 2020

really slow videos with 0 detail, really weird questions after videos with answers such as "a million billion" idk what this is supposed to be

par Harley F

18 nov. 2020

Too long and boring, im sorry. i can see the purpose but if it was modernised it would be better

par Colleen B

31 janv. 2021

The instructors were really bad, it was painful to listen to the course information.

par Artem

11 oct. 2015

Only part 3 was partly interesting and usefull. All the rest is vain.

par Vasili K

5 oct. 2020

Water over water. Just selling the books and personalities.

par Manisha B

29 nov. 2020

I didn’t get my certificate even after completion

par Sebastián

22 juin 2016

No hay buena traducción

par Mauro v V

18 oct. 2019

Fuck this shit

par Chris O

12 sept. 2015

I broke every rule of efficient and effective learning until I met this course, Dr. Barbara Oakley Dr. Terrence Sejnowski, and the book: “A Mind for Numbers”.

I wish I had met your group and this powerful vehicle of learning earlier –university wouldn’t have been so costly (studying the inefficient way) and the rewards could be even more phenomenal with this awareness. Nevertheless, your incredible work will continue to help mitigate the cost.

Although I maintained good grades through university primarily because of my high enthusiasm, interest and determination to achieve excellence in life–long learning, but the personal cost was undue stress –over studying, keeping many late nights, dependency on caffeine and life-work-family balance. However, I imagined there had to be a better way.

The frustrations and occasionally being at my wits end in solving some of the problems in the computer programming languages I am currently learning have instantly dissipated because of this course. I have completely changed my old and inefficient learning methods and formed new habits for learning.

Amazingly, I failed to solve the triangle problem on the first try at the end of a long day of work and study (after staring at it for about 45mins) in the book: “A Mind For Numbers” by Dr. Barbara Oakley. However, determined, I gave it another shot the next morning, right after waking up -it took me less than 30 seconds to solve. You’ve got to love the diffuse mode…

While I love academia and stand ready to dance with whatever pain it dishes out at me in my life-long learning journey, this course has single-handedly removed current and whatever inherent or perceived pain that may be associated with life-long academic learning for me.

There is a better way to rote learning method -a different, efficient and effective approach… Academic goal or any subject matter no longer need to take many years of painful endurance to achieve or master.

This course has armed me with the ultimate set of tools to expertly construct efficient and effective learning methods with measureable success. Essentially, I have learned how to hack my academic growth and goal.

Finally, in the past, I stumbled upon one or two of the methods taught in this course in academic journals and other articles. However, these occasional, inconsistent and isolated pieces of information were not cohesive to form a powerful enough force to help build a fundamental understanding and practice of efficient learning methods. Additionally, overpowering the well-formed habit of the inefficient rote learning method was a challenge.

Fortunately, this course and the book: “A Mind For Numbers” by Dr. Barbara Oakley, compiled and put all of these scientific data on efficient learning methods in to proper perspective, easy enough for anyone to understand and practice.

In the afterword chapter of the book, Dr. David B. Daniel said it best:

“There has long been a stream of potentially productive study advice coming from scientists. Unfortunately, it has seldom been translated so the average student can easily grasp and use it. Not every scientist has a knack for translation, and not every writer has a firm grasp of the science. In this book, Barbara Oakley threaded this needle beautifully. Her use of vivid examples and explanations of the strategies reveals not only how useful but how credible these ideas are.”

Thank you Dr. Barbara Oakley and the Learning How to Learn Team for a job well done! Your work is indelible in my mind and I can be certain, in others too.

par Ali A P B

24 août 2019

This is the first real elaborated review I´ve done in my life. That´s the kind of impact this course can produce. I felt like I wanted to express my opinion about it and my gratitude. If you are someone who likes learning or teaching, or need to perform those activities in your everyday life for any reason, then you should take this course without hesitation. The information given is so valuable and eye opening. I personally like to read a lot and gain new knowledge about anything, but I always had that little feeling that I was not being truly efficient in doing it, that I was doing something wrong or, going further, that I wasn´t capable or smart enough to retain the information I was trying to learn, because I usually found myself investing a lot of time reading over and over again a material to realize, weeks later, that I had forgotten almost all of it. That, of course, caused me a lot of frustration. I used to feel that I was wasting my time. I knew that the best way to learn something was trough practice, but this course helped me understand how the process of learning really works, the correct way of practicing and the mistakes people usually make (illusions of learning).

I had read years ago a book about memory and memorization (Una Mente Prodigiosa by Ramón Campayo), originally written in spanish (I´m a native spanish speaker), which gave me a lot of insights and tools for memorizing better, but I never applied it to my learning process. This course has filled the gap between memorizing and learning, the missing piece that I needed to complete the puzzle. The tools mentioned in that book are also mentioned here, but joined together with the process of learning subjects completely, with understanding, creativity, flexibility, associations and long term memorization.

I have used the tools given in this course to learn and memorize the course itself, and they have been truly effective. I have also used them in studying in my own area of work, which is mechanical engineering, and also have proven to be quite useful. I now feel that the information stay in my mind for longer, which helps to understand new and more complex concepts better. Of course, memorizing is not learning, real learning comprises a lot of other things, but it´s a very important part of the learning process. If you can´t remember the material, then you can´t use the information to solve anything, to learn new things or to use the information creatively.

I also play the piano, and I have even used some of the information while practicing and learning new songs. This demonstrates that the concepts of the course can be used in any field, as long as you´re learning something.

Another important and pleasant aspect of this course, is the way Dr. Barbara Oakley presents the material. She is so kind and friendly, which gives you the sensation that you are listening to a close friend or someone that you´ve known for a long time. That makes the course material more accessible and enjoyable. Dr. Terry Sejnowski also does a very good job at teaching. They´re just so easy to hear. The material is very clear and well organized.

I will say like Dr. Barbara says very often: I can´t thank you both enough for this course. I´m really grateful. Learning is a lifelong process, and that´s where the importance of this course lies.

par L K

21 sept. 2020

I thought this was an absolutely great course and I am so glad I took it.

For me, multiple choice tests, problem sets and expository rather than analytic term papers were the norm.

These examination procedures are relatively objective ways to evaluate learning.

In addition, as US students, we were sometimes also expected to make oral presentations. By the way, the oral presentations of Oakley and Sejnowski were superb. When I asked my English students to come to class with an oral presentation, they addressed whatever objections or fears that they may have had, by not coming class on the day given - they knew their grade was based solely on one essay written at home and one essay written under exam conditions.

Anyway, from having studied and taught in England, my experience has been that multiple choice tests are derided, and hardly used at all for more advanced students. Being able to write an essay about something is valued or evaluated. I have taught courses where there was an essay for the exam and an essay for the term project, and that was it. To me, essays are certainly useful, and I wish that I was better at writing them myself. The drawbacks are at least two. 1) Valuing essays alone tends to favor those who can make something sound good rather than those who might have a superior understanding of a subject. This has a less than salutary effect on political discourse, among other things, not that we are doing better in the US at the moment. It favours those who sound clever rather than those who actually are clever. 2) It means that students can sometimes strategize - they may know they only have to answer 2 essay questions about two subjects out of five subjects for example, so they may not bother to learn 3/5 of the material, and there is no way to tell whether they have as much knowledge about the other subjects as about the one they wrote about in their essay.

"The Learning How to Learn" Coursera course would help any student to understand the material that they would have to write about either quickly or in a more considered way, but it leaves out the whole question (nearly) of how to get better at writing about what you have learned. This is not exactly a criticism of the course. You are likely to have heard of this tendency to value essay writing above all else in the British system. That "Learning" means different things in different places is hardly an earth-shaking conclusion but I thought I would mention it.

Thank you very much for the course. It was completely fantastic and I am so glad that a friend recommended it to me.

par Mark V

13 mars 2016

This is a great course. The concepts and techniques taught here should be required by every teacher and student in our school systems from kindergarten on. Of course, some of the material is well beyond the grasp of a kindergartner, but the techniques and methods can be taught by how their teacher manages the delivery of curriculum. It is never too early to teach our children how to learn.

This is a wonderfully succinct presentation of key concepts that I wish had been available to me in my youth. I was very fortunate to have an anatomy and physiology professor in college in 1979 that took time in his lectures to teach about how the brain learns and some methods and principles for study, retention, and recall. I saw many of his concepts in this course.

I later went on to teach college myself. I found the students in my Freshman course on data communications were particularly lazy about making an effort to learn material thoroughly. I knew this bad habit would hinder their progress in the semesters to come.

I adopted a practice of making my mid-term exam a thorough (not to be confused with level of difficulty) test of their understanding. Consequently, 60% would fail that test. When delivering the bad news I also delivered a path to recovering from that score. I provide several hours of lecture on what I learned about learning from my A&P professor. Then I offered a retest. The questions were posed differently in wording and type (multiple choice vs short answer essay vs T/F). Everyone improved their score significantly and the pass/fail distribution reflected more of a bell curve distribution.

Interestingly, when I tried teach how to learn before the mid-term I still saw a 60% failure rates. I expect somethings require more motivation. The risk of failing a course proved to be motivating, so I capitalized on that human behavior. I wish I could have found a better way, because this approach cost several lecture hours of data communications instruction. However, teaching them to learn proved so much more valuable.

I, unexpectedly had the same high failure rate on a term test teach an Algebra class. I responded in kind with lectures on how to learn. On student that started with failing the first term test almost dropped. Another student that had taken other classes encouraged her stay on and to learn how to learn. She finish Algebra with an A-. At the end of the course she came to me with the most treasured compliment of my teach career, "You taught me that I can learn anything I want to learn."