Who is this class for: Our target audience for this course includes the following: 1. New engineering hires to a company that uses (or wants to use) fluid power. 2. Engineering graduate students engaged in a research project that uses fluid power. 3. Engineering undergraduate students who wish to be exposed to fluid power. 4. Anyone with a curiosity who wishes to gain a deeper understanding for how fluid power systems work.


Created by:  University of Minnesota

Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
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4.8 stars
Average User Rating 4.8See what learners said
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Coursework
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Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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University of Minnesota
The University of Minnesota is among the largest public research universities in the country, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional students a multitude of opportunities for study and research. Located at the heart of one of the nation’s most vibrant, diverse metropolitan communities, students on the campuses in Minneapolis and St. Paul benefit from extensive partnerships with world-renowned health centers, international corporations, government agencies, and arts, nonprofit, and public service organizations.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.8 out of 5 of 141 ratings

Great professors

this is good course

Very informative course providing elaborative and descriptive material.

Good introduction to fluid power mains components. Some exercises are very school-like and would not appear as real life problems to solve but it's mainly at the beginning and cease as the course go on. Other than that I only regret that there is not a following course to this one going into more detail of each components (their failure modes, the way to size / test them), a focus on seals and leakages, etc... Thank you again for the team and their effort to create an interesting and applied course.